BREAST LYMPHATIC MASSAGE

why is it important for lactating women to receive breast lymphatic messages?

Receiving and learning how to do a lymphatic breast massage can have a therapeutic effect on a woman’s health and quality of her breast milk. The breasts are comprised of fatty tissues that contain many lymph vessels and very little muscle. Our muscles help to move fluid throughout the lymphatic system with movement and exercise. Breasts do not typically receive enough movement to facilitate this process and this can cause blocked ducts or mastitis. Fortunately, professional lymphatic and self-breast massage can enable a person to stimulate this process manually. There’s a growing amount of research suggesting that breast lymphatic massage may have many benefits for lactating women and the quality of their milk.

When should they start?

By starting within the first few weeks post-delivery, as the changes within the breast are high, lymphatic breast massages many reduce the chance or eliminate blocked milk ducts and mastitis. If a milk duct is already blocked or mastitis is being treated, receiving a session may reduce future episodes.

how julie helps

This 60-minute Lymphatic Breast Massage is very gentle with minimal discomfort. Julie does not use any cupping during this session. can have a health breastfeeding experience.

 It is 100% hands-on so she can feel the areas of tension and slowly allow the tissue to release. Julie believes that using your infant to create self-expression of the milk helps make the process more gentle with already sensitive tissue. Julie recommends adding a 30-minute Infant Craniosacral session for your baby during this process to allow Julie to work on your tissues and help your infant’s latch. This ensures that you and your nursing baby can have a healthy breastfeeding experience.

Studies Show...

A study in 2004 determined that lymphatic breast massage greatly increased the quality of breastmilk. The greatest benefits of improved quality were seen in the first year postpartum. The parts of the milk that improved with massage included

  • solids
  • lipids
  • casein concentration
  • gross energy

In another study, two groups of new breastfeeding mothers were compared where one group was given two 30-minute breast massages within 10 days after giving birth, and the other group was not. The mothers that had the massage experienced less breast pain while feeding, the babies suckled more at the breast, and the milk itself contained less sodium.

Book Breast Lymphatic Massage Appointment

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